Starting the final table of the WSOP 2016 Main Event by playing aggressively has paid off well for Qui Nguyen. He won the event and the $8 million dollar first place prize. Though it wasn’t always smooth sailing, he pulled out a win which has become expected for those who play aggressively.
He came into the final table winning small to medium and several large pots against Gordon Vayo who was second in chip count and Gordon Josephy who was third. Josephy came out early moving up but his rise was crimped by Vayo who was dealt some strong hands as Josephy doubled up. He was left short stacked. He rallied for a bit till being eliminated by Vayo. Josephy took home $3.5 million for his work. This set the stage for Nguyen and Vayo.
The heads up match was long at 8 hours with many twists and turns. Vayo had gotten the chip lead briefly but that was changed after half an hour. The two battled back and forth till Nguyen took control. He went all-in on the river and Vayo folded with 80,000,000 chips on the table. Later Nguyen took another chunk of chips leaving Vayo weakened.
Nguyen continued to build on his lead eventually winning with a pair of kings against Vayo’s jack – ten spades combination.
Highlights of the tournament are in the video below.

Nguyen’s win highlights the effects of aggression in poker. If you sit at a table, you see it all the time. Players who raise often, even with questionable hands, often come out ahead.
The results were:
Qui Nguyen $8,005,310
Gordon Vayo $4,661,228
Cliff Josephy $3,453,035
Michael Ruane $2,576,003
Vojtech Ruzicka $1,935,288
Kenny Hallaert $1,464,258
Griffin Benger $1,250,190
Jerry Wong $1,100,076
Fernando Pons $1,000,000
For most of the players, this is a high point of the poker career. Nguyen had his largest cash at this event. His previous top finish was $9000 and he earned his first bracelet. It’s rare to have repeat winners who place tops in the Main Event over and over.

A 30 year old poker pro from Chitown, Alexander Ziskin has won the $1500 No Limit Holdem Tournament at the WSOP 2016. It’s not only his first WSOP final table, but bracelet as well. And at 30, expect more from him in the road ahead. For the win, Ziskin pockets $401,494.

The heads up tournament had some serious ups and downs. At first it looked like Ziskin would win with his opponent, Jens Grieme, down to a single blind. Then, Grieme doubled up several times to getting the chip lead. This lead to an unscheduled fourth day of competition.
The next day, the heads up match continued though briefly after an hour and a half, Ziskin won with a pair of eights. This tournament also ranks as one of the longest sessions in the history of the WSOP.
The tournament had 1,796 entries with a total prize pool of $2,424,600.
The top finishers in the tournament:
Alexander Ziskin $401,494
Jens Grieme $248,067
Kam Low $179,187
Patrick Power $130,780
Severin Schleser $96,452
Craig Mason $71,891
Marino Mura $54,160
Davis Juenemann $41,244
Aaron Kweskin $31,754

Well known poker players who cashed in this event include Max Steinberg, actor James Woods, who has cashed three times in the 2016 series, and Greg Raymer.

Ian Johns Wins $10,000 Limit Holdem Tournament at the 2016 WSOP
This is a great summer for Ian Johns, he’s just got his second bracelet in the $10,000 Limit Holdem Tournament. This is his third bracelet. He previously won in the H.O.R.S.E. tournament. The 31 year old is amazed at his success. He takes home $290,635 for his efforts. The total prize pool was $1,034,000 from 110 entries.
The pool narrowed to Johns and Sean Berrios. It came down to a head to head with Johns and Berrios. Holding a king and eight of diamonds against Berrios ace and 10 unsuited. The flop rolled out 8 of spades and 4 and 3 of diamonds giving Johns a pair and potential flush. The remaining two cards did nothing for either hand but Johns won the game with a pair of eights.
The top finishers were:
Ian Johns $290,635
Sean Berrios $179,625
Alexander Balynskiy $125,571
David Chiu $89,810
Jeff Thompson $65,752
Bill Chen $49,304
Brock Parker $37,888
Brian Rast $29,855
Anh Van Nguyen $24,140
Philip Tom $20,042

2016 WSOP Seniors Tournament Won by Johnnie Craig
I couldn’t call a senior a senior at the age of 54 but in poker it’s another story. But Johnnie Craig has won the WSOP 2016 Seniors tournament and pocketed a very nice $538,204 along the way. It’s the Texan native’s first WSOP final table, as well as bracelet. His previous finish was 140th in WSOP. This was the largest seniors tournament in history. In fact, this year has seen a rise in entries across the board. There were 4,499 entries creating a prize pool of $4,049,000.
Though scheduled for three days, the record field necessitated a fourth day. In the finale there was a lot of action. Though Day 3 was dominated by Wesley Chong, his lead was chipped away in the fourth day. Concluding with head to head between Craig and movie producer, Jim Lotti the action narrowed. Craig won most of his pots creating large chip advantage at the same time. Lotti moved all-in with unsuited ace and seven but hit a wall against Craig pocket four pair. The flop changed nothing and Craig won with a pair of fours!
The top finishers in the event were:
Johnnie Craig $538,204
Jim Lotti $332,413
Roger Sippl $245,389
Joe Somerville $182,536
Wesley Chong $136,829
Paul Runge $103,366
Eugene Solomon $78,699
Michael Lisanti $60,392
Alan Cutler $46,713

Viatcheslav Ortynskiy Wins Six Handed Pot Limit Omaha Event at the WSOP 2016
Russia has got its first bracelet of the WSOP in Viatcheslav Ortynskiy’s win in the Six Handed Pot Limit event. This is his ninth WSOP cash and fourth final table at the WSOP, but his fir gold bracelet. His previous best finish was in 2013 in third place. For his work, Ortynskiy gets $344,327 and a bracelet. He is a poker pro and plays mostly the European Poker Tour.
During the last half hour of the tournament was a dream come true for Ortynskiy, he won nearly every pot. In a final stage of a tournament, those wins really add up quickly.
The top finishers in the tournament were:
Viatcheslav Ortynskiy $344,327
Rafael Lebron $212,779
Randy Ohel $141,187
Matthew Humphrey $95,623
George Wolff $66,134
Joshua Gibson $46,727
Antti Nieminen $33,744

Former grocery bagger turned poker pro, Jason Dewitt, has bagged first place at the WSOP 2016 $1500 Millionair Maker Tournament. It was the first time the top two prizes guaranteed $1 million dollars. The event had 1,079 entries for a prize pool of $9,706,500. This tournament had players from age 21 to 92. The Millionaire Maker event takes place over five days. Dewitt who hales from San Diego claimed the first place 1,065,403 prize.
For Dewitt, this marks his seventh WSOP final table appearance and brings his total WSOP earnings to $2,557,482. He also received his second gold bracelet for the win.
Dewitt’s strategy throughout the tournament was to raise, re-raise and put the competition on the defensive. Raising and re-raising almost automatically puts fellow players into doubt about their cards strength since only a royal flush is guaranteed and every thing else is negotiable. Many will opt to fold. As a strategy over multiple hands, this is a very effective way to build a nice chip stack . It helps to have good strong hands as well.
The final hand was heads up against Garrett Greer a was won with a King high hand against Greer’s Queen high hand.
Other tournament highlights were: a schoolteacher from Washington, Lisa Meredith, scraped enough money to make the tournament and walked away with $500,000. This was her first WSOP and impressive that she won third place . She’s previously won the Pendelton OR tournament.
Alex Jacob, tv show Jeopardy’s most winning player finished in 52nd place.
The top finishers were:
Jason Dewitt $1,065,403
Garrett Greer $1,000,000
Lisa Meredith $500,000
Frank Rusnak $366,787
Luke Brereton $276,632
Arkadiy Tsinis $210,112
Mikhail Semin $160,725
Alessio Dicesare $123,828
Stanley Lee $96,091

Here is highlight of Stanley getting eliminated at 9th place.

This the heads up match between Dewitt and Greer.

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During a poker tournament if you look at the amount of players during the entry period, it’s usually small. As the entry period starts to close ,in the last several rounds, more and more people fill up the seats. Many people don’t want to bet with the small amounts of pots when the tournament is starting and prefer to wait till the pots get substantial. This often works out well for sharks who re-raise or a good bluffers and can poke their way around a table. But it doesn’t always work. Furthermore, as the tournament progresses, there are usually several high chip stacked players who will remain that way throughout the entire tournament. It’s true it’s time to buckle down after the early stages but those enter late tend to risk more and don’t always win.

Early Stages
Early stage accumulation is one of the smartest ways to go. If you’re on the ball it’s great way to get to heads up or at least final table. Why? If you bet less you keep more chips and risk less than those who enter late and are counting on a pair of aces or ace king or bluffing to bail them out. Getting in early also has an advantage that you can see who you’re playing against. If you are member of an online poker casino and there are regulars you might know their style of play. Some bet only when they have something others will throw a curve ball and bet with nothing. It’s part of the game. Getting in early in tournament means you can have a ace pair that doesn’t amount to a hill of beans and still keep going if it loses while the late entry person will probably go all-in and lose everything if it should lose. Getting in early gives you the advantage of less risky chip accumulation as well as getting a heads up on your fellow players.

Middle Stages
The middle stage of the tournament is much the same but there are sometimes more changes. The late entry person is usually scrambling for chips less they get eaten up by the blinds and more prone to go all-in at the first sign of a good hand usually a single high card. Here is another benefit of getting in early. You may play and ace 6 combo or fold and you may be right. There is little choice for the late entry dude he must play or potentially bust. It’s great to be in relaxed position at the table. Here if someone raises extremely high and you know there a bluffer you can call . Likewise, when you get a high full house, you can raise as well. Great hands do come for everyone in a tournament it’s just a matter of timing and putting the cards into play.
And one strategy to think about is waiting . Yeh. Don’t try to size up all hands sometimes it’s not worth it to see if your hand ‘could be’. Don’t risk sit out and wait. I used this strategy all the way to a final table after an inital run up and it really works. Let the other players go in. It may their cycle anyway. Your chip stack might go lower, but you’re still in the game and some great hands could be coming your way. You’re not guaranteed to be dealt a winning hand every round!

This is the major reason you want to get in early. You’re not guaranteed a winning hand every round but if you’re in early you can get enough of a chipstack to go the distance and get the heads up or at least final table.