Joining the elite poker pro ranks, John Hennigan has won the $10,000 H.O.R.S.E. event at the WSOP 2018 and collects his fifth gold bracelet. Only a few players have reached five bracelets:Stu Ungar, Scotty Nguyen, and Jason Mercier among others.
The event had 166 players. For his win, he also gets $414,692. It was his 2nd final table for year. H.O.R.S.E. is a combination of poker games including Holdem, Omaha, Razz, Seven Card Stud and Seven Card Stud Eight or Better.
The multi-day event had Hennigan in third place till a crucial hand of trip queens and king beat out Daniel Zack’s trip queen with a nine kicker. His scores continues with a seven card studn hand. Ultimately, Hennigan triumphed.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 John Hennigan $414,692
2 David Baker $256,297
3 Lee Salem $179,216
4 Iraj Parvizi $127,724
5 Randy Ohel $92,808
6 Albert Daher $68,783
7 Daniel Zack $52,016
8 Michael Noori $40,155

$10,000 Deuce to Seven Lowball Event Won by Brian Rast at the 2018 WSOP

Poker pro has done two things. First, he won the $10,000 Deuce to Lowball event. Secondly, he has joined the likes of poker greats Amarillo Slim, Bobby Baldwin and others who have four WSOP bracelets. In this event, he won over a field of 95 players. Even in the event, poker legend Doyle Brunson, who made final table, himself played. The first place finish reaps a $259,670.
The final day of the event had Rast in 4th place with 11 remaining players. Rast eliminated John Hennigan and then Doyle Brunson. Rast has stated he only plays with the best. This is often a key to success and becoming the best. Play with the best.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Brian Rast $259,670
2 Michael Wattel $160,489
3 Dario Sammartino $114,023
4 James Alexander $81,986
5 Shawn Sheikhan $59,669
6 Doyle Brunson $43,963
7 John Hennigan $32,796

Arne Kern Wins 2018 World Series of Poker $1,500 Millionaire Maker Event

The Millionaire Maker event at the WSOP is a coveted event due to the low entry and huge reward. This event had 7,361 entries with a prize pool of $9,937,350. It was the third largest field in the history of the event. Arne Kern, a German poker player, took it down with a first place finish, bracelet, and $1,173,223.
The four day event had plenty of well known players like Joe Mckeehen, Manig Loeser, Ralph Massey among others. McKeehen took the lead for part of the day but at the final table Kern and Sam Razavi won key hands that propelled both of them to the top. McKeehen, having lost a fair amount of chips, was just left with some big blinds and elimated in 3rd place. But this being his seventh final table for the year moves McKeehen into 5th place for the year. He also took home $538,276.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Arne Kern $1,173,223
2 Sam Razavi $724,756
3 Joseph McKeehen $538,276
4 Michael Souza $402,614
5 Justin Liberto $303,294
6 Manuel Ruivo $230,120
7 Barny Boatman $175,865
8 Ralph Massey $135,383
9 Sean Marshall $104,987

Benjamin Dobson Wins 2018 WSOP $1,500 Seven Card Stud Eight-or-Better Event

British poker pro Benjamin Dobson has won the $1500 Seven Card Stud Eight or Better event at the WSOP 2018. There were a total of 596 players. For his efforts, he takes home $173,528 and his first gold bracelet.
He scored big at several key parts of the event with great pots.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Benjamin Dobson $173,528
2 Timothy Finne $107,243
3 Jesse Martin $74,324
4 Richard Monroe $52,359
5 Tom McCormick $37,504
6 James Nelson $27,321
7 Georgios Sotiropo $20,248
8 Peter Brownstein $15,271

Filippos Stavrakis Wins $1,000 Pot-Limit Omaha Event at the 2018 WSOP
From a field of 986 players, Filippos Stavrakis has won the $1000 Pot-Limit Omaha event at 2018 WSOP. For the win he gets his first gold bracelet and $169,842.
The event was played over several days with Stavrakis coming into the final day with the chip lead. He extended this lead till he and Jordan Siegel had taken control of the table. In the end, Stavrakis won.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Filippos Stavrakis $169,842
2 Jordan Siegel $104,924
3 Felipe Ramos $73,989
4 Clint Monfort $52,879
5 Peter Klein $38,309
6 Pascal Damois $28,137
7 Thayer Rasmussen $20,957
8 Georgios Karavokyris $15,832
9 Robert Cowen $12,133

French journalist William Reymond has won the 365 Online event at the 2018 WSOP. He defeated a field of nearly 3000 to claim the first gold bracelet of the WSOP and nearly $155,000. The tournament lasted a grueling 12 hours. The entry fee was a miniscule $365.

$100,000 High Roller Event
In the WSOP’s first ever $100,000 High Roller event, Nick Petrangelo has walked away with his second bracelet and first place prize of nearly $3 million dollars. There were over 100 entries. The 31 year old Massachusetts native now has nearly $15 million in lifetime earnings.
The event itself featured a who’s who of the poker world including Fedor Holz, Adrian Mateos, and Jaon Koon among other players. Petrangelo won with a two pair of aces and eights. The results are below:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Nick Petrangelo $2,910,227
2 Elio Fox $1,798,658
3 Aymon Hata $1,247,230
4 Andreas Eiler $886,793
5 Bryn Kenney $646,927
6 Stephen Chidwick $484,551
7 Jason Koon $372,894
8 Adrian Mateos $295,066
9 Fedor Holz $240,265

$1500 Omaha Hi/Lo 8 or Better Won by Julien Martini
He made “julien” of all his fellow poker players and emerged to win the $1500 Omaha 8 or better event. Though, originally scheduled for 3 days it hadn’t finished and a 4th day added. The field of 911 players “prophetic” were eliminated bust by bust. The heads up came down to Kate Hoang and Julien Martini. Martini won not only nearly $240,000 but also his first bracelet. Runner up Kate Hoang took home $148,000.

Elio Fox Wins $10,000 Turbo Bounty
Elio Fox has won the $10,000 Turbo Bounty event at this years’ WSOP. He took home his second gold bracelet and nearly $400,000 for his efforts. The prize pool of $2,284,200 was split among 37 top finishers.
The final results are below:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Elio Fox $393,693
2 Adam Adler $243,323
3 Paul Volpe $169,195
4 Danny Wong $119,659
5 Charles Yohannan $86,096
6 Alex Foxen $63,042
7 David Eldridge $46,993
8 Taylor Black $35,671
9 Joseph Cada $27,582

Joe Cada Wins 2018 World Series of Poker $3,000 No-Limit Hold’em Shootout

Joe Cada, 2009 Main Event champ, has won his third gold bracelet to win the 2018 WSOP $3000 Shootout Event. He won from a field of 363 entrants including Joseph Mckeehen. For the 30 year old player it brings his winnings to nearly $11 million dollars. A nice sum for a 30 year old.
The final results are:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Joseph Cada $226,218
2 Sam Phillips $139,804
3 Joseph McKeehen $101,766
4 Jack Maskill $74,782
5 Harry Lodge $55,480
6 Ihar Soika $41,559
7 Anthony Reategui $31,435
8 Taylor Wilson $24,013
9 Joshua Turner $18,526

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Roberly Felicio Wins Colossus Poker Tourney at 2018 WSOP
Brazilian restaurant owner, Roberly Felicio has won the Colossus. The tournament had a 565 buy-in and for his work, he took home $1 million dollars. He defeated Sang Liu. He previous won in last year’s Monster Stack. This tournament was also notable since Phil Ivey made his return and cashed in the tournament too.
The Colossus entries at 13,000 is the lowest turn out for the event since it started three years ago.
The results are:
Place Player Payout
1 Roberly Felicio $1,000,000
2 Sang Liu $500,000
3 Joel Wurtzel $300,000
4 Scott Margereson $220,040
5 Tim Miles $166,091
6 Song Choe $126,158
7 Gunther Dumsky $96,431
8 John Racener $74,178
9 Steven Jones $57,425

Andrey Zhigalov Wins H.O.R.S.E. $1500 Event at WSOP
Russian account Andry Zhigalov has won the H.O.R.S.E. event at the 2018 WSOP. In doing so, he wins his first gold bracelet and over $200,000 for the first place finish. He defeated a field of over 700 players.
He prefers mixed games and has had several cashes in mixed events but this is his largest to date.
Amazingly, he came back from being short stacked to taking a huge lead.
The final results were:

Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Andrey Zhigalov $202,787
2 Tim Frazin $125,336
3 Bradley Smith $87,769
4 Matt Woodward $62,379
5 Nicholas Derke $45,006
6 Sandeep Vasudevan $32,971
7 Scott Clements $24,531
8 J.W. Smith $18,541

Justin Bonomo Wins 2018 WSOP $10,000 No-Limit Hold’em Heads-Up Championship
Justin Bonomo Wins $10,000 Heads Up NHL Event at 2018 WSOP. Taking home his second bracelet and over $185,000 is just another notch on his belt for the year. He came to the final match with a 7:1 chip lead and pummelled runner up Jason McConnon. McConnon took home $115,000 for his efforts.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
Champion Justin Bonomo $185,965
Finalist Jason McConnon $114,933
Semi-Finalist Juan Dominguez $73,179
Semi-Finalist Martijn Gerrits $73,179
Quarter-Finalist Jan Eric Schwippert $31,086
Quarter-Finalist Mark McGovern $31,086
Quarter-Finalist Nicolai Morris $31,086
Quarter-Finalist Kahle Burns $31,086

Justin Bonomo is on a roll this year. He’s moved into third place on the money list. This year he added nearly $15 million dollars to his bottom line. He recently cashed for $5 million in the Super High Roller Bowl and $4.8 million in the Super High Roller Bowl China. His live event total is over $32 million dollars and sure to increase at his age of 32.

Benjamin Moon Wins 2018 WSOP $1,500 No-Limit Hold’em Big Blind Ante Event
San Diego poker pro Benjamin Moon won the $1500 NHL Big Blind Ante. The big blind ante format is the new approach to poker tournaments. In the betting, the big blind puts up the ante for all players. In theory it saves time as someone with a low chip stack would put in some rounds all of their chips when it’s their turn at big blind. No waiting for that ace pair with this format. That is the criticism of the format. Those with weak cards would have to use their chips in any case and not hold on to to a small stack in hopes of something better.
Nonetheless, Moon won over field of 1300 players. He takes home $315,000. He also gets his first bracelet. Though new at the WSOP, the big blind ante format is de riguer in Los Angeles and San Diego where Moon plays regularly. He says it does in fact play faster.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Benjamin Moon $315,346
2 Romain Lewis $194,837
3 Colin Robinson $138,938
4 Steven Snyder $100,268
5 Nhathanh Nguyen $73,242
6 Bohdan Slyvinskyi $54,160
7 Eric Polirer $40,549
8 Raymond Ho $30,742
9 Dutch Boyd $23,605

A limited playing field should mean limited winnings? Not quite. The 2018 Super High Roller Bowl is one of the most lucrative poker events in the poker world with a buy-in of $300,000 . Last year Christoph Vogelsang took home $6 million at the event. This year Justin Bonomo was the man who slayed the donkeys and took home $5 million defeating Dan Negreanu in the process.
The poker tournaments was a who’s who of the poker world. Players and personalities like Bill Perkins, Antonio Esfandiari, Fedor Holz, Brian Rast. In fact, anyone with $300,000 to play a poker should be pretty good. It was a collection of the world’s top poker players.
The structure is somewhat different. The top seven players are the only ones who cash. For every 20 paid entries, there are two satellite seats available. The tournament is a four day event.
For Bonomo, the win was a drop in the bucket for an otherwise stellar year.
The top finishers for the event were:
Justin Bonomo $5,000,000
Daniel Negreanu $3,000,000
Jason Koon $2,100,000
Mikita Badziakouski $1,600,000
Christoph Vogelsang $1,200,000
Nick Petrangelo $900,000

Ognyan Dimov has won the $1500 Six-Max NLH event at the 2018 WSOP. He is the third Bulgarian to ever win a title. This is his first gold bracelet and he takes this along with the $378,743 first place prize. He is 2/3 of the way to winning poker’s triple crown.
Dimov quickly knocked out players on his way to winning the title at the final table.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Ognyan Dimov $378,743
2 Antonio Barbato $233,992
3 Nick Schulman $163,785
4 Ryan D’Angelo $116,118
5 Joey Weissman $83,396
6 Yue Du $60,686

Craig Varnell Wins 2018 World Series of Poker $565 Pot-limit Omaha Event
Triumphant over a field of 2419 players, Craig Varnell has won the $565 Pot limit Omaha event at the WSOP. For his efforts he takes home $181m790 and a gold bracelet. It’s his third final table finish.
He took chip lead after knocking out Jonathan Duhamel in the final table. With over 75 percent of the chips in play he took on Maxime Heroux. His lead only increased after that ultimately winning over Seth Zimmerman. His winning hand was a straight up.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Craig Varnell $181,790
2 Seth Zimmerman $112,347
3 Omar Mehmood $81,852
4 Maxime Heroux $60,190
5 Christopher Trang $44,677
6 Jonathan Duhamel $33,477
7 Shaome Yang $25,325
8 Jason Lipiner $19,344
9 Ilian Li $14,920

Jeremy Wien Wins $5000 No Limit Holdem Big Blind Ante Event
Winning over a field of 518 players, Jeremy Wien has won the WSOP $5000 NHL Big Blind Ante event. Wien, a derivatives trader from Mt. Kisco, NY gets his first gold bracelet and $537,710. It’s his first final table though he’s had several cashes. He did say he had a bracelet ceremony planned in his head. This gives some insight into a type of strategy called visualization. See yourself in a ceremony speech is like meditation towards the goal.
Laka lead for most of the day with Wien in second place but heads up against Wien, Laka yielded to second place.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Jeremy Wien $537,710
2 David Laka $332,328
3 Eric Blair $228,307
4 Jake Schindler $159,575
5 John Amato $113,510
6 Shawn Buchanan $82,199
7 David Peters $60,618
8 Richard Tuhrim $45,538
9 Patrick Truong $34,862

Philip Long Wins the 2018 World Series of Poker $1,500 Eight-game Mixed Event
Winning his first gold bracelet and $147,348, Phillip Long has won the Eight-game Mixed event at the 2018 WSOP. There were many notables in the event including Daniel Negreanu and John Racener among others. There were 481 entrants.
Mixed event poker games are a benchmark in deciding if a player is a great all around player. Many poker pros play these events for the prestige in winning such an event.
The final results were:

Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Philip Long $147,348
2 Kevin Malis $91,042
3 Daniel Negreanu $59,788
4 John Racener $40,151
5 Per Hildebrand $27,587
6 Nicholas Derke $19,404

Adam Friedman Wins 2018 WSOP $10,000 Dealer’s Choice Six-Max Event
36 year old poker pro Adam Friedman won the $10,000 Dealers’s Choice Six-Max event at the WSOP 2018. He triumphed over a field of 111 and in the process won his second gold bracelet and $293,275. His live tourney earning are almost $2.5 million.
The Dealer’s Choice event allows players to choice from a variety of poker games with variants of flops, draws and stud. Players are able to select from 20 different poker games. The prestige in winning the event comes from being considered a top all around poker player.
The final hand was stud eight or better with Friedman winning with a queens up. He played against Stuart Rutter who finished in second place taking home $181,258.
The final results were:
Place Player Earnings (USD)
1 Adam Friedman $293,275
2 Stuart Rutter $181,258
3 Alexey Makarov $127,487
4 Chris Klodnicki $90,713
5 David Baker $65,308
6 Marco Johnson $47,579

These tips are mostly for live poker tournaments. A brief summary of the video is it covers table image, and hands to play. Of course, no one has all the answers but Negreanu has covered a lot of territory in the poker world most people could only dream of.
Initially, he says you should focus on your opponents. Are they sharks or donkeys, loose or aggressive? Another thing he focuses on is small pairs and suited connectors. Early in the tournament, they could be priceless but in the later stages not as much. He also touches base on table image and the need know what you’re putting out. Opponents will re-raise or fold in some cases based on the image you are putting out there.

Early Stages of Poker Tournament

How do you play in the early levels of a tournament okay and the answer isn’t to just open up your iPad or check Twitter. It’s to really focus on your opponents. I’m going to give you three specific tips on what to think about on day 1 of a tournament now. Of course, it’s going to depend a little bit on how long the levels are. But let’s say for this example, we’re going to talk about a tournament like the world series of poker with 60-minute levels which gives you plenty of time to set a table image and do a lot of other good things. Okay, the first thing you want to be like really clear on is the fact you can’t win the tournament on day 1 but you can lose it you can totally bust yourself.

Don’t Be in a Rush

Don’t be in a rush to accumulate a big stack of chips on day one because the value of those chips isn’t worth the risk of you going broke. There’s no prize unless you’re playing at the bay one-on-one WPT for being shift leader at the end of day one and really the reward doesn’t outweigh the amount of risk that you have to take. And the downside of going broke. So, for example, look at it this way if I could play ten tournaments right and with the average stack in all ten imagine that straight all ten or have the chip lead in you know four of them and be or less like three of them and be out in seven of them. That’s not the kind of Poker I want to play on day one. So you want to make sure you’re in it to win it but not on day one. Just be alive and you’ll have a chance to win later getting all those chips really is not going to give you a big advantage the second day.

Suited Connectors and Small Pairs

Another thing I want to talk about in terms of early play is suited connectors small pairs and how they relate to like big pairs like aces. Right now aces are obviously the best hand to hold. But aces are a much better hand later in a tournament when you can get it on before the flop. You play against one opponent maybe get in on the flop early in a tournament. When you guys are really deep in chips if you play a big pile of aces you’re probably losing okay. Aces are a hand that you know you get married to early on, you know. The board comes jack, eight, six ,turns a four mean yeah you know the guy might just have a jack but he could easily have a straight trips. It’s early on people, play a lot more funky hands and so should you. In the early stages, small pairs and suited connectors go up in value. In a tournament, they’re worth more so, seven, eight suited is much better in level one than it would be when you’re playing on the bubble trying to see some flops and you’re not that deep.Those hands play much better deep because listen you take a few shots you throw a few jabs here and there you see some flops you don’t hit anything doesn’t not get a tournament it’s not a significant percentage of your stack. However, later, you know, you just keep messing around with seven eight suited in pocket threes and pocket fours you’re all of a sudden going to look at your twenty five big blinds and think wait a second well I only got fourteen blinds and I’m in shove mode. So, you want to be looking for more four big pairs late obviously and early play them carefully big pairs play them carefully suited connectors pocket pairs be way more willing to see flops with those kind of hands.

Table Image

The third thing I want you guys to be aware of when you’re playing your list ages is your table image. Okay, I want to be very self aware of the hands you’re turning over of also the things you say at the table in terms of how your playing style affects, you know, your mood and whatever it is that you’re babbling about. Be aware that everybody’s listening and they’re gonna adjust that information and decide what kind of player you are especially when they see the hands you’re turning over. So, really be mindful okay I just showed four Bluffs in a row or three bet three times in a row hmm I think my opponents are starting to not believe me so much. So, then you have to adjust or you can actually set up a table which if you’re deep enough and you feel like you know you’re a newcomer nobody knows you you’re so you know middle-aged dude who doesn’t look like he knows what he’s doing and you got all these young whippersnappers with headphones and sunglasses and doing the thing right. You go in there pretending like you don’t know what you’re doing maybe you throw in a few wild you know re-raises here and there and then later you play a little more set up whatever it is you do. Be very mindful of what you’re giving up in terms of information and use that information to your benefit.

Don’t let them exploit you you exploit them.

 

 

Fedor Holz is one of today’s top poker players. With earnings approaching 30 million dollars, I thought a mini bio would be an inspiration for many people looking at the world of poker and everything you can get out of it. Born July 25, 1993, his mother was a teen mom and he grew up with a distant father and two younger sisters. Since his mother had to quit school because of him and raise not only him but two daughters as well, he sees this period as a time of lots of challenges. In his family expectations were extremely high but he couldn’t meet many of those expectations and often lost interest in many things. Being a smaller guy, he was often bullied. He thinks that showing interest in some things and being excited could have an impact on those around him but not necessarily a positive one. He felt his enthusiasm could spark a backlash around those who might not have been as interested in things as he was. As a result, he lost interest in things and just went along with the flow, passionless but just going.
He went to college for computer science but again he wasn’t interested in it. He was playing poker since he was 16 but at college he. He continued playing poker with friends who were making 2000 Euros a month. It was enough at the time to afford trips and etc. He was interested in something at that point. He wasn’t successful in the beginning. He stuck with it and set strict goals that are hard to achieve and would stick to them everyday. During this period, he changed his mentality from results driven to overall goal related. One of the key reasons he loves poker is that everything is really on the individual. Any mistake as well as any victory is all about the individual.
After 2016, his first major year when he won or made $16,000,000, he found himself at a crossroad. Though being one of the world’s top poker players was his goal. He found the most important thing was the process of getting there and not necesarily the end result. How he reached the overall goal was more important than the overall goal itself. The interest in poker was more important than the cash itself. At this point he started a business Primed Mind and he briefly retired from poker.
During his retirement from poker he started Primed Mind. Primed Mind was launched with Holz’ poker coach Elliot Roe. It takes the same principles used to help Holz achieve his poker goals. These same principles can be used to achieve anything else in life according to Holz and his coach. It’s an app available at Google Play. Users listen to a mindset coach named Elliot. The goal is to allow visualization, and relaxation techniques to set goals. The ultimate agenda is create self confidence, better health, personal growth and recovery skills. He along with Nathan Schmitt and Duane Ludwig are the three key people at Primed Mind along with Elliot Roe, the mindset coach. It’s an interesting concept and has led to dramatic results for Holz. This is also a way to give back and help others who want to achieve their goals. He has won tens of millions of dollars at live poker events as well as online.
PokerStars is where Holz has played poker the most online. His nickname is Crownupguy and his results there are impressive as well. He was Pocketfives top player for the years 2015 and 2016. More recently, Holz has signed on with Party Poker. The online poker juggernaut to become one of their representatives. This means major money, lots of great compensation in the forms of being able to play top games and salary. It is hoped this move will attract more players to the site. He will wear the Party Poker logo at live tournaments and help design a high roller series to offered at Party Poker.
Holz’ top ten cashes, though they probably don’t mean too much to him since they are in the past. Everyone is salivating over the numbers. So here’s a look at his top cashes. It’s arranged with tournament date, name, buyin, Holz finish and cash result.
 Jul 10, 2016 $111,111 No-Limit Hold’em for One Drop 2016 World Series of Poker $111,111 1 $4,981,775
Jun 01, 2016 $300,000 No-Limit Hold’em Seven Max 2016 Super High Roller Bowl $300,000 2 $3,500,000
Jan 04, 2016 $200,000 No-Limit Hold’em 2016 WPT National – Philippines $196,000 1 $3,463,500
Oct 20, 2017 HKD 1,000,000 No-Limit Hold’em 2017 Triton Super High Roller Series $128,150 2 $2,131,740
Dec 20, 2015 $100,000 No-Limit Hold’em 2015 Five Diamond Classic (WPT) $100,000 1 $1,589,219
Aug 22, 2016 €50,000 No-Limit Hold’em EPT Season XIII / Estrellas – Barcelona $55,253 1 $1,471,485
Apr 03, 2017 HKD$400,000 No-Limit Hold’em Shot Clock 2017 PokerStars Championship Macau $51,473 2 $877,392
Jun 04, 2016 $50,000 No-Limit Hold’em 2016 Super High Roller 9 $50,000 1 $637,392
Sep 15, 2017 $50,000 No-Limit Hold’em 2017 Poker Masters $50,000 2 $550,000
Sep 20, 2017 $100,000 No-Limit Hold’em 2017 Poker Masters $100,000 3 $504,000
Jul 17, 2017 HKD 250,000 No-Limit Hold’em Six Max 2017 Triton Super High Roller Series $32,022 1 $451,386

Card Player Poker Tour

The Card Player Poker Tour will return to the Venetian from December 4 thru 11. The series features over $900,000 in gtd prize money. It’s one of the most popular poker circuits with tourneys held around the U.S. like Seneca Niagara in New York.
The main event features a $500,000 3500 buy-in event. This tournament lasts four days starting December 8. There are three satellites for the event at the Venetian from December 6-8.
Additional events scheduled include the $600 DoubleStack on Dec. 5 and offering a guaranteed pool of $150,000, as well as a no-limit hold’em $300 rebuy tourney with a guarantee of $25,000 starting on Dec. 10. Earlier this year, the Venetian hosted the Card Player Poker Tour Venetian $5000 buy-in main event, which drew nearly 700 poker players. That event had anticipated a guarantee of $2 million; however, the overwhelming attraction of entries resulted in over $3.1 million being awarded, with the first-place winner, Javier Gomez, receiving $561,349. Hopefully, this one will exceed the guarantee as well. Card Player is one of the top destinations online for poker players and enthusiasts.

Hong Kong Poker player Park Yu Cheung Breaks Cashes in Year Record

Hong Kong poker player Park Yu Cheung has broken the record for the most cashes in a year with 62. He broke the record at Asia Championship of Poker in Macau.
His recent streak of luck has boosted his career earnings to over a million dollars. This year he won almost a third of that with $317,000 in cashes this year so far. Previously, he averaged $75,000 annually.
Before becoming a professional poker player, he was an accountant. He is chairman of the Hong Kong Poker Players Association.

Patrik Antonius Gripes about Poker

Finnish professional poker player has over $20 million dollars in tournament wins both online and land based. He is one of the elite top poker players in the world and he has criticism for both online and land based tournaments.
He stopped playing online tournaments because of HUDS or poker analyst software that sizes up situations and technically help players win more. Will online operators stop the use of HUDS? Who knows but many places accept the use of them.
He also has criticized players who take too long to make decisions at live poker events. This takes away the momentum. Also players having conversations while at the tables interfere with concentration and the ability to make good decisions and taking up more time for players to make decisions.
Bill Perkins, a poker wunderkind, also agrees and won’t play anywhere that doesn’t have a shot clock. Another poker player, Steffen Sontheimer tweeted the absence of a shot clock is killing the game. The World Poker Tour, WPT, introduced a shot clock in 2016. Maybe other live poker events will follow.

 

With the recent surge in players at Americas Cardroom, the online poker room will be hosting million dollar Sunday tournaments each week the first quarter of 2018. There will be lots of satellite events where players can gain entry for a fraction of the $250 buy-in fee. If you’re not a member, now is great time to sign up and get the feel that will make you a winner. For new members, you get a wealth of bonuses including up to $1000 cash back, a couple of freerolls and free jackpot poker entries. Jackpot poker is played like a slots machine where you can win a random jackpot as you play poker. The poker game is run concurrently and is the standard no limit holdem poker.
As noted above, the Sunday Million Dollar Events will be every Sunday from January to March right now. If it works out, then you can expect it to grow and be every Sunday!. Many players at other online poker rooms have been disappointed with recent changes and have lead an exodus to other cardrooms. Americas Cardroom has picked up many new players and is now according to Forbes, one of the top ten cardrooms in the world. Great customer service, new offerings, nice bonuses all come together for a great way to spend the day. And Americas Cardroom is always on the forefront of whatever is new like mobile poker.
Mobile Poker
Play mobile poker games at Americas Cardoom. To get started you need an account already. From there go to play.americascardroom.eu and enter your username and password and you’re good to go. To get an account simply download the software to your computer, install and create a username and password. Just that simple. With mobile poker, you can play anywhere, anytime. And while Americas Cardroom has a wealth of big buck tournaments, you can play in free cash games, freerolls 24/7 or low to mid stakes poker tournaments and cash games. It’s got something for everyone from new poker players to the very experienced.
Upcoming Events
In November, there will be a High Five Series. The High Five Series is poker festival at ACR, they sponsor several times a year. The theme is “420”. The series culminates in a $420,000 Main Event and the winner not only gets the top cash prize but a bracelet as well.
Punta Cana Poker Results
For several years, ACR, has sponsored the Punta Cana Poker event in Santo Domingo. This year, 2017, Roberto Carvallo from Chile and Jamin Stokes split the first place prize and each got $97,590 after a long heads up match. Carvallo was declared the winner for the trophy and title with a pair of 3s. For members of ACR, there have been satellite tourneys for the event. The hotel in Santo Domingo rocks and looks like the kind that has been featured in many music videos of the “good life”.
Million dollar Sundays, mobile poker, and recurrent poker series as well as the land based Punta Cana Poker Classic are reasons to check ACR out. For new members, get a wealth of great incentives and for current members check out the great comp for players.

By Rick Braddy

Welcome to the fifth in my Texas Holdem Poker Strategy Series, focusing on no limit Texas Holdem poker tournament play and associated strategies. In this article, we’ll examine starting hand decisions.

It may seem obvious, but deciding which starting hands to play, and which ones to skip playing, is one of the most important Texas Holdem poker decisions you’ll make. Deciding which starting hands to play begins by accounting for several factors:

* Starting Hand “groups” (Sklansky made some good suggestions in his classic “Theory of Poker” book by David Sklansky)

* Your table position

* Number of players at the table

* Chip position

Sklansky originally proposed some Texas Holdem poker starting hand groups, which turned out to be very useful as general guidelines. Below you’ll find a “modified” (enhanced) version of the Sklansky starting hands table. I adapted the original Sklansky tables, which were “too tight” and rigid for my liking, into a more playable approach that are used in the Poker Sidekick poker odds calculator. Here’s the key to these starting hands:

Groups 1 to 8: These are essentially the same scale as Sklansky originally proposed, although some hands have been shifted around to improve playability and there is no group 9.

Group 30: These are now “questionable” hands, hands that should be played rarely, but can be reasonably played occasionally in order to mix things up and keep your opponents off balance. Loose players will play these a bit more often, tight players will rarely play them, experienced players will open with them only occasionally and randomly.

The table below is the exact set of starting hands that Poker Sidekick uses when it calculates starting poker hands. If you use Poker Sidekick, it will tell you which group each starting hand is in (if you can’t remember them), along with estimating the “relative strength” of each starting hand. You can just print this article and use it as a starting hand reference.

Group 1: AA, KK, AKs

Group 2: QQ, JJ, AK, AQs, AJs, KQs

Group 3: TT, AQ, ATs, KJs, QJs, JTs

Group 4: 99, 88, AJ, AT, KQ, KTs, QTs, J9s, T9s, 98s

Group 5: 77, 66, A9s, A5s-A2s, K9s, KJ, KT, QJ, QT, Q9s, JT, QJ, T8s, 97s, 87s, 76s, 65s

Group 6: 55, 44, 33, 22, K9, J9, 86s

Group 7: T9, 98, 85s

Group 8: Q9, J8, T8, 87, 76, 65

Group 30: A9s-A6s, A8-A2, K8-K2, K8-K2s, J8s, J7s, T7, 96s, 75s, 74s, 64s, 54s, 53s, 43s, 42s, 32s, 32

All other hands not shown (virtually unplayable).

So, those are the enhanced Sklasky Texas Holdem poker starting hand tables.

The later your position at the table (dealer is latest position, small blind is earliest), the more starting hands you should play. If you’re on the dealer button, with a full table, play groups 1 through 6. If you’re in middle position, reduce play to groups 1 through 3 (tight) and 4 (loose). In early position, reduce play to groups 1 (tight) or 1 through 2 (loose). Of course, in the big blind, you get what you get.

As the number of players drops into the 5 to 7 range, I recommend tightening up overall and playing far fewer, premium hands from the better positions (groups 1 – 2). This is a great time to forget about chasing flush and straight draws, which puts you at risk and wastes chips.

As the number of players drops to 4, it’s time to open up and play far more hands (groups 1 – 5), but carefully. At this stage, you’re close to being in the money in a Texas Holdem poker tournament, so be extra careful. I’ll often just protect my blinds, steal occasionally, and try to let the smaller stacks get blinded or knocked out (putting me into the money). If I’m one of the small stacks, well, then I’m forced to pick the best hand I can get and go all-in and hope to double-up.

When the play is down to 3, it’s time to avoid engaging with big stacks and hang on to see if we can land 2nd place, heads-up. I tend to tighten up a bit here, playing very similar to when there’s just 3 players (avoiding confrontation unless I’m holding a pair or an Ace or a King, if possible).

Once you’re heads-up, well, that’s a topic for a completely different article, but in general, it’s time to become extraordinarily aggressive, raise a lot, and become “pushy”.

In tournaments, it’s always important to keep track of your chips stack size relative to the blinds and everyone else’s stacks. If you’re short on chips, then play far fewer hands (tigher), and when you do get a good hand, extract as many chips as you can with it. If you’re the big stack, well, you should avoid unnecessary confrontation, but use your big stack position to push everyone around and steal blinds occasionally as well – without risking too many chips in the process (the other players will be trying to use you to double-up, so be careful).

Well, that’s a quick overview of an improved set of starting hands and some general rules for adjusting starting hand play based upon game conditions throughout the tournament.

Until next time, best of luck to you at the Texas Holdem poker tables!

Rick

Rick Braddy is an avid writer, Texas Holdem player and professional software developer and marketer for over 25 years. His websites and Texas Holdem poker software helps people become better Texas Holdem players. If you’re a poker player, be sure to visit his Texas Holdem poker poker today and learn how you can play better Texas Holdem poker, too.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rick_Braddy/2011

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By Rick Braddy

Welcome to the fourth in my Texas Holdem Strategy Series, focusing on no limit Texas Holdem poker tournament play and associated strategies. In this article, we’ll examine the “Sit and Go” tournament – the most popular online poker tournament format today.

When I first started playing in Sit and Go tournaments, I was beginning to think they called it “sit and go” because you sat down, played a little, then it was time to go do something else since you’d just been whacked and knocked out of the tournament! These tournaments can be really tough, since they’re effectively like being at the “final table” of a regular tournament.

The recent popularity of playing online Sit & Go tournaments sometimes amazes me. On any given evening, you can try to jump into a Sit and Go (SNG) table on Party Poker, for example, and easily find yourself competing just to get into a seat before that table fills up, forcing you to go find another table (especially on lower-entry fee tables). I’ve seen times when it can take up to 10 attempts to get into a Sit and Go tournament table during prime time. That’s because there are literally thousands of players across the world who are hungry to get into these tournaments and hopefully win some money.

All of the major online poker rooms now offer Sit and Go format games now, so you can find a place to play just about everywhere. You can think of these games as being very similar to small “satellite” tournament games that surround the bigger poker tournaments at traditional poker tournament venues. They also somewhat resemble play at a final table in a regular tournament, with one key exception – nobody at this table earned their way to this tournament table – they simply paid their entry-fee to play there. Because of this, the broad range of players and skill levels you’re likely to encounter varies wildly – one of many challenges you’ll face in Sit and Go play.

Generally, there are two types of Sit and Go tournaments offered. Single table and multi-table tournaments. Nowadays, there is also a faster game, sometimes referred to as “Turbo” mode SNG tournaments. In these games, the tempo of the tournament is much faster (blinds go up every 5 minutes instead of 15 minutes), with the blinds increasing much faster and less time allowed to make your decisions. This is a very challenging game format, but it does move along much faster than a traditional Sit and Go tournament.

You can also get into 4-player and heads-up (2 player) games, which just effectively puts you into the poker tournament final table, short-handed mode of operation immediately, so you can play the end-game out from there. I don’t really prefer these games, though, since there are far fewer players and therefore the pool size available to win is much smaller and not as worthwhile.

In general, two-table Sit and Go’s are much more profitable, since they begin with more players (18 to 20), making the prize pool larger and more attractive. Once you know how to play and win in these Sit and Go tournaments and can adjust your play appropriately, the number of tables and players really doesn’t matter as much, since you’ll be able to adapt your play quickly as the situation changes around you.

Some of my favorite places to play Sit & Go tournaments include Party Poker, Poker Stars and PrimaPoker’s Captain Cook’s poker rooms. There are many awesome poker rooms out there, with a wide range of players frequenting each of them. They are all very similar.

There are a number of different entry-fee levels to choose from, typically ranging from $5 up to $5,000. There is very little difference in playing in the lower limit games in the $5 to $30 range. When you get above the $30 threshold, the level of players you’ll encounter improves dramatically. The poker room site typically takes a “rake”, a fee of around 10% for hosting the tournament, and the balance of the funds go into the prize pool. In single-table SNG tournaments, the payout goes to the top 3 finishers. In two-table games, the top 4 places are generally paid.

In higher entry-fee games, you’ll be playing against some very good players. In these high tier games, you’ll encounter some of the best, most dangerous players around. If you’re interested in getting into these high stakes games, one way is to win enough at the lower stake games so that you earn, or leverage, your smaller entry-fees into the bigger games, a traditional way that satellite games work and a good approach to take.

I play in a lot of Sit and Go tournaments and regular tournaments, both online and in casinos and poker rooms. Throughout all of this, I have finally learned how to win consistently at Sit and Go tournaments. There are some key areas that you must focus on and shore up in order to properly “shape” your play and end up in the money.

You’ll need a well-rounded approach, though, to place in the money consistently at Sit and Go tournaments, including:

* Playing Position Correctly – you’ll need to know how to use position in the Sit and Go tournament to your advantage, which hands to play in which positions and how to keep from losing your chips from poor positions. Earlier in the tournament, it’s best to be more conservative with your play by only playing the best hands from the best positions.

* Adjusting to Changing Conditions – the key to winning Sit and Go tournaments is adjusting your play style and approach as the blinds and number of players increases. Done correctly, you’ll end up in the final 3 in the money up to half of the time (no approach you can take will allow you to win all of the time). As the game progresses, you must adjust or the blinds will eat you up.

* Winning Heads-up Play – arguably one of the most misunderstood, yet most fun part of any tournament, is playing heads-up against another good player. Learning to play winning heads-up poker means the difference between being the Winner and 2nd Place – a huge difference in payout in all tournaments goes to the winner, along with the recognition as the champion, so you must learn to play great heads-up poker. In general, you must play much more aggressively heads up than you would otherwise.

* Beating Aggressive Players – see my article on playing vs. aggressive players, which will definitely make a difference for Sit and Go play, as it explains how to take advantage of aggressive and wild players, without losing all of your chips in the process.

* Online Tells – there are many different special tells that you can use when playing online. Do you know them? Do you use them? If not, chances are they’re being used against you! For example, when players use checkboxes online and make a lot of their decisions ahead of time, then suddenly they’re not using the checkbox (because they’re taking longer), that could be a tell that they’re having to think things through more, which could be a tell. If they use checkboxes and act instantly, chances are they don’t have a very good hand, so didn’t even need to think about it (just clicked the checkbox and now waiting on the next card).

* Successful Bluffing and Blind Stealing – one of the most important moves in poker is bluffing the opponents, and in tournament play, you must be capable of successfully bluffing in order to survive the blinds and antes and to win heads-up. You can’t bluff weak players, so don’t even try. You’ll need to learn how determine the style or type of the players, so you’ll recognize who to bluff.

The next time you’re thinking about playing a poker tournament, give the Sit and Go a try. It’s a fast-paced tournament, where you’ll have the opportunity to experience first hand what it’s like to play at that Texas Holdem poker tournament final table. You’ll go through a sequence of fast play and changing conditions, starting from a full table of 10 players, progressing rapidly to only 5 to 6. Then, if you’re a good enough player, you’ll find yourself in the most dangerous position of all – where you’re one of only 4 players remaining, so you’re only one seat out of the money. The key goal is surviving to the heads-up phase, so you get a shot at being the tournament winner, who receives the bulk of the prize pool.

So, you can practice for bigger tournament events by playing in Sit and Go tournaments and that way you’ll be very comfortable when you do make it that final table in a big Texas Holdem poker tournament, and you’ll have a lot of fun and gain some great Texas Holdem tournament poker experience along the way.

Rick Braddy is an avid writer, Texas Holdem player and professional software developer and marketer for over 25 years. His websites and Texas Holdem poker tournament e-course helps people become better Texas Holdem tournament players. If you’re a poker player, be sure to visit his Texas Holdem websites today and learn how you can play better Texas Holdem, too.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rick_Braddy/2011

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