Former grocery bagger turned poker pro, Jason Dewitt, has bagged first place at the WSOP 2016 $1500 Millionair Maker Tournament. It was the first time the top two prizes guaranteed $1 million dollars. The event had 1,079 entries for a prize pool of $9,706,500. This tournament had players from age 21 to 92. The Millionaire Maker event takes place over five days. Dewitt who hales from San Diego claimed the first place 1,065,403 prize.
For Dewitt, this marks his seventh WSOP final table appearance and brings his total WSOP earnings to $2,557,482. He also received his second gold bracelet for the win.
Dewitt’s strategy throughout the tournament was to raise, re-raise and put the competition on the defensive. Raising and re-raising almost automatically puts fellow players into doubt about their cards strength since only a royal flush is guaranteed and every thing else is negotiable. Many will opt to fold. As a strategy over multiple hands, this is a very effective way to build a nice chip stack . It helps to have good strong hands as well.
The final hand was heads up against Garrett Greer a was won with a King high hand against Greer’s Queen high hand.
Other tournament highlights were: a schoolteacher from Washington, Lisa Meredith, scraped enough money to make the tournament and walked away with $500,000. This was her first WSOP and impressive that she won third place . She’s previously won the Pendelton OR tournament.
Alex Jacob, tv show Jeopardy’s most winning player finished in 52nd place.
The top finishers were:
Jason Dewitt $1,065,403
Garrett Greer $1,000,000
Lisa Meredith $500,000
Frank Rusnak $366,787
Luke Brereton $276,632
Arkadiy Tsinis $210,112
Mikhail Semin $160,725
Alessio Dicesare $123,828
Stanley Lee $96,091

Here is highlight of Stanley getting eliminated at 9th place.

This the heads up match between Dewitt and Greer.

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The WSOP 2016 Dealer’s Choice Tournament was won by Jean Gaspard. A former professional basketball player. He can claim his largest cash to date. His total WSOP and Circuit earning are nearly $900,000 but this is his first bracelet. To win the Dealer’s Choice Tournament a considerable amount of knowledge and skill must be known about 19 variants of poker games. Players who win here are considered more overall poker players and are often masters of the individual poker games. For his win, he pockets $306,621. Runner up William O’Neill collected $189,505.
The first Dealer’s Choice was in 2014 It is a mixed poker variant game with the dealer at the button given the option of game to play. There are 19 different games that can be played in this tournament. The games and descriptions are below.
No Limit/Pot Limit Games
No Limit Holdem is one of the most popular forms of poker played today. It’s the seen the most on tv and is the game played at the Main Event.
Pot Limit Holdem is very similar to No Limit the main difference is betting limits prevent all-ins and this makes stealing blinds harder.
Pot Limit Omaha because of the four hole cards, a wide range of winning hands is possible. There are more all-ins in this poker variant.
Pot Limit Omaha Hi Lo Split Eights of Better is a more complex poker variant. Low hands and high hands can both win. Since this is a more complex game winning this game along with the Dealer’s Choice helps to demonstrate overall great poker playing.
Big O is a game where players get 5 hole cards instead of 4 and it’s played similar to Pot Limit Omaha HI Lo so high and low hands can both win. It’s a rarely played game except at the WSOP and large poker tournaments.
No Limit 2 7 Single Draw is similar to the Triple draw version but there are no limits in the betting structure and two rounds of betting.
No Limit Five Card Draw is a poker variant with only once chance to draw. A strong starting hand makes a difference and pairs, two pair and three of a kinds are the winning hands most players look for.
Stud Games
Seven Card Stud was the most popular form of poker till No Limit Holdem rose to take number one. Two hole cards are dealt face down, one face up door card and three more cards are dealt face up. Because it’s not as popular, older players have an experience edge with this game..
Seven Card Stud Hi Low Eights or Better is another less frequently played game today. Older and experienced players have an edge.
Seven Card Stud Hi Low Regular is a high low game without the eights or better restriction. Either high or low can win.
Razz is the low ball version of stud poker and the goal is to get the lowest hand. For those great a reading fellow players, this is a great game since it’s more simple poker variant game.
Limit Flop Draw Games
Limit Holdem is the betting limit version of No Limit Holdem.
Limit Omaha Hi uses four hole cards and has more potential winning combinations.
Limit Omaha Hi Low Eights or Better is great game for those not trying to bust out. Aces are high and low. It’s more common for pots to be split among players.
Limit A-5 Triple Draw Lowball doesn’t count straights or flushes and Aces are low. The objective is low hand wins.
Limit 2 – 7 Triple Low Ball is similar to Limit ace through five but straights and flushes are included. Deuces and sevens are critical.
Badugi is mostly played in Asia and is similar to Limit Ace – Five but played with four cards. Unpaired and unsuited cards are the cards to play. It’s a challenging game.
Badacy is a Ace Five variant but half the pot goes to the best Badugi hand. Being a split pot poker game diminishes potential wins but can cover help prevent busting out.
Baducy is a complex 2 – 7 type of Badacy. It’s a split pot poker game between the best 2 – 7 dras and Badugi hand. It’s a combination of 2 – 7 Triple Draw and Badugi.
These are the poker variants that need to be mastered for the Dealer’s Choice event. The player on the button can choose between any of these games. Jean Gaspard has finally walked away with this one . But these game brings all the experienced players to the table and you will probably find these players competiting in other games as well.
The top winners in this event were:

Jean Gaspard $306,621

William O’Neil $189,505

John Monnette $135,061

Randy Obel $96,876

Mikhail Semin $69,937

Viacheslav Zhukov $50,818

James Obst $37,167

Andrew Brown $37,167

Dan Smith $27,362